87raven

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#Kiara #R.I.P.

#Kiara #R.I.P.

scinote:

Coming soon: SciNote.org, launched by entrop-e, shychemist, and geogallery, is Tumblr’s project for promoting science education around the world.

At SciNote, we believe that science shouldn’t just be reading about the ideas of people with PhDs and Nobel Prizes. We believe that science is an active process of asking questions and finding answers.
That’s why we, at SciNote, want to hear from you. We want to ponder the interesting questions you pose and get excited with you over the cool science you see in your world.
SciNote will feature the best of the Tumblr science community, and we will compile and publish the top posts from every year in the form of a magazine available both digitally and in print. Think of SciNote magazine as the Tumblr science magazine.
We hope to celebrate our launch by featuring some of the coolest science from around Tumblr. So before we launch SciNote, we would like to collect 25 science posts and/or questions from you, including:
the most interesting science news you have come across
questions you’ve always wanted to ask
fascinating facts that you’ve learned
pictures of nature and/or science that you’ve taken
cool research that you’ve participated in
any other science-related thing you’d like to tell us!

So please:
Submit posts or ask questions to be featured on our blog and for an opportunity to be published in SciNote magazine.
Follow our blog at SciNote.org.
Read more about our project here.
If you’re interested, apply to join our staff here.
Reblog this post so that we can collect 25 posts and launch our project as soon as possible!
Thank you all and happy science!

scinote:

Coming soon: SciNote.org, launched by entrop-e, shychemist, and geogallery, is Tumblr’s project for promoting science education around the world.

At SciNote, we believe that science shouldn’t just be reading about the ideas of people with PhDs and Nobel Prizes. We believe that science is an active process of asking questions and finding answers.

That’s why we, at SciNote, want to hear from you. We want to ponder the interesting questions you pose and get excited with you over the cool science you see in your world.

SciNote will feature the best of the Tumblr science community, and we will compile and publish the top posts from every year in the form of a magazine available both digitally and in print. Think of SciNote magazine as the Tumblr science magazine.

We hope to celebrate our launch by featuring some of the coolest science from around Tumblr. So before we launch SciNote, we would like to collect 25 science posts and/or questions from you, including:

  • the most interesting science news you have come across
  • questions you’ve always wanted to ask
  • fascinating facts that you’ve learned
  • pictures of nature and/or science that you’ve taken
  • cool research that you’ve participated in
  • any other science-related thing you’d like to tell us!

So please:

  1. Submit posts or ask questions to be featured on our blog and for an opportunity to be published in SciNote magazine.
  2. Follow our blog at SciNote.org.
  3. Read more about our project here.
  4. If you’re interested, apply to join our staff here.
  5. Reblog this post so that we can collect 25 posts and launch our project as soon as possible!

Thank you all and happy science!

thenomadundergrad:

Extracting the product after a diazonium coupling reaction using diethyl ether and water.
Diazonium coupling is a reaction used to introduce a functional group via electrophilic substitution to an aromatic ring system, such as naphthalene in this case. In this reaction, methylferrocene was coupled to 6-amino-2-naphthenyl-methyl-ester.A diazonium salt needs to be prepared for the reaction ‘in situ’, since the intermediate compound is too unstable to store. Once the salt is being prepared, it must not be allowed to reach a temperature above 5°C, or else the N+≡N group rapidly decomposes into N2 gas and may cause an explosion due to the rapid increase of pressure within the flask. 

thenomadundergrad:

Extracting the product after a diazonium coupling reaction using diethyl ether and water.

Diazonium coupling is a reaction used to introduce a functional group via electrophilic substitution to an aromatic ring system, such as naphthalene in this case. In this reaction, methylferrocene was coupled to 6-amino-2-naphthenyl-methyl-ester.

A diazonium salt needs to be prepared for the reaction ‘in situ’, since the intermediate compound is too unstable to store. Once the salt is being prepared, it must not be allowed to reach a temperature above 5°C, or else the N+≡N group rapidly decomposes into Ngas and may cause an explosion due to the rapid increase of pressure within the flask. 

theartofanimation:

Hong Kuang

(Source: everythingshark)

gentlemanbones:

These almond cookies are very aggressive.

gentlemanbones:

These almond cookies are very aggressive.

(Source: reddit.com)

(Source: pushthemovement)

afro-dominicano:


Partial Eclipse at Moonrise by David Malin

A partial lunar eclipse at Moonrise is photographed in a multi-exposure image from Port Hedland, Western Australia.

afro-dominicano:

Partial Eclipse at Moonrise by David Malin

A partial lunar eclipse at Moonrise is photographed in a multi-exposure image from Port Hedland, Western Australia.

biomedicalephemera:

Top - Malayan Forest Gecko (Cyrtodactylus pulchellus) 

Center/Bottom - Crested Gecko (Correlophus ciliatus)

Why do geckos (and some other terrestrial lizards) lick their eyeballs?

Wouldn’t you, if you could? I sure would. Other than the fact that they have cool long tongues, geckos (and many of their terrestrial brethren) have non-functional eyelids, but rely strongly on their eyesight. In order to maintain their vision, they lick their eyes!

Several mammals, such as okapi and giraffe, also lick their eyes, though they still have functional eyelids.

Unrelated cool fact! "Eyelash geckos", otherwise known as crested geckos, were once thought to be extinct! In 1994, however, they were re-discovered in a southern province of New Caledonia. They bred easily in captivity, and are now one of the most popular pet reptiles.

Malayan Forest Gecko via Wikimedia Commons

"Lizard Lick" via It’s Erin! on Flickr

selchieproductions:

This is brilliant.